After learning today that Reverend Douglas Rivera posted bail and was released from Covina Police custody, Glendale City Church of Seventh-day Adventists (GCCSDA) has communicated with his attorney and his congregation, God’s Gypsy Christian Church / Renew Your Mind Ministries (RYMM) that Rev. Rivera is prohibited from entering our church campus. The Glendale Police Department is also aware of this and is prepared to assist us as necessary.
When our congregation gathered for worship on Saturday, we took time to pray for the victims of this tragic event, for RYMM and for Rev. Rivera. We continue to stand ready to provide support any way we can to those affected by this tragedy.
Todd Leonard, Senior Pastor, Glendale City Church of Seventh-day Adventists


This evening, Glendale City Church of Seventh-day Adventists (GCCSDA) learned about an alleged sexual assault by Rev. Douglas Rivera, pastor of God’s Gypsy Christian Church / Renewing Your Mind Ministries (RYMM).
The relationship between Glendale City Church and RYMM is simply lessor to lessee. RYMM is unaffiliated with the ministry of GCCSDA or the Seventh-day Adventist denomination. RYMM has a worship service on the GCCSDA campus on Sunday evenings and a prayer meeting service on Thursday evenings. We have had this lease relationship since January 2017.
Our thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families, with the RYMM congregation, with law enforcement and with Rev. Rivera. We pray for justice and healing to win the day.
Todd Leonard, Senior Pastor, Glendale City Church of Seventh-day Adventists

Read what others have been saying about Glendale City Church

Adventist Congregations on Both Coasts Reach out to LGBT Communities after Orlando Shooting

The Glendale City Adventist Church in Glendale, California will host a community vigil to honor the victims tomorrow (Tuesday, June 14). From 11:00 am to 7:30 pm, the doors of the sanctuary will be open for mourning and reflection. At 7:30 pm, the church will host a service of remembrance. A media release for the event provided…

Read full article on Spectrum Magazine

Tightrope Walkers

Todd Leonard is the Lead Pastor at Glendale City Church, which is in my conference. Months ago, he approached me about taking action to address the race relations issues that are sadly prevalent not only in the larger society but in our very own conference. I’m grateful for that. Todd is White. And, no, he obviously doesn’t speak for his entire ethnic group (just as the actions of no single individual becomes the representation of their entire people group). But having him take the initiative was necessary. It demonstrated that there was a desire by individuals within the majority culture to tear down the walls of separation.

Read more at Spectrum Magazine

Glendale City Church to hear from Senate chaplain

Rear Adm. Barry Black, chaplain of the U.S. Senate, will speak at 11 a.m. next Saturday at Glendale City Church, 610 E. California Ave.

Black served in the U.S. Navy for 27 years, culminating as chief of Navy Chaplains. He has written two books: his autobiography in 2006 titled “From the Hood to the Hill” and “The Blessing of Adversity” in 2011….

Read more at Glendale News-Press

Intersections: How a church became a beacon of acceptance

Around 30 years ago in the middle of a Bible study class at a Seventh-day Adventist Church in Glendale, something close to a miracle took place.

It was the 1980s. The AIDS epidemic, and the panic that went along with it, was in full force. But Carlos Martinez needed to tell his truth. And so, on a Wednesday morning, while sitting with 30 senior women, Martinez listened to the worries of a mother whose son had died from cirrhosis of the liver and the anguish she felt at how beatings at home could have driven him to become an alcoholic…

Read more at Los Angeles Times

Intersections: A church in Glendale stands out for its inclusiveness

Carlos Martinez knew what a difference the Seventh-day Adventist Glendale City Church had made in his life. When he told his Bible study group he was gay, he received overwhelming love and support. When he slowly succumbed to AIDS, he received visitors from church around the clock at a time when no one dared to interact with AIDS patients. When he died, Rudy Torres remembers 900 people attending his funeral…

Read more at Los Angeles Times